Clinic

 

Clinic FAQ's

Clinic FAQ Questions

Questions & Answers

Is this a free clinic?

Animal Welfare League is a low-cost veterinary clinic. Payment is due at time of service and we accept cash, check, Visa, Mastercard or Discover. We offer a discounted office visit for those that are on state assistance programs with photo identification. Our clinic offers a multitude of discounted services including shot specials, surgery specials, dental specials and more.

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Do you accept payment plans or take CareCredit?

Animal Welfare League is unable to accept a Payment plan and we currently do not accept CareCredit.  We accept cash, check, Visa, Mastercard or Discover.

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My pet has an emergency. Can I make an appointment?

Our veterinarian clinic operates on a first-come, first-serve basis. We are open Monday-Friday from 10am – 9pm and Saturdays from 9am – 6pm. You must be signed in at least one hour prior to closing. For emergencies, we do offer a Triage Service at an additional cost. You may let the clinic reception know when you arrive if you need Triage Services for your pet.

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What is the latest I can come in?

Our veterinarian clinic is open Monday-Friday from 10am – 9pm and Saturdays from 9am – 6pm. You must be signed in at least one hour prior to closing. Please be advised that due to extreme high client volume, the clinic has the right to determine if they can accept any further clients for that day no matter what time of day it is.

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Do you still do microchip day?

We offer discounted AVID ID microchips on the last Saturday of every month. Microchips are only $19 on that day. They are available anytime for $38.

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Do you have a spay/neuter/vaccination program for pitbulls?

We do not have a program especially designated for bully breeds as we are already a low-cost clinic. We offer specials on vaccinations and surgeries for all breeds of dogs.

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What vaccinations does my dog need?

The first goal of good pet health is to try to prevent diseases. And this is what vaccinations do. After all, it’s much easier to prevent a disease than to treat it once it strikes. Proper vaccinations are a very reliable way to prevent diseases ave money and assure a happy, healthy pet.

Young puppies are highly susceptible to certain infectious diseases and should be vaccinated against them as soon as they are old enough to build immunity. These diseases are distemper, infectious hepatitis, parvovirus, parainfluenza, and rabies. Leptospirosis, coronavirus, bordetella, bronchiseptica, and Lyme disease vaccinations are optional, depending on the occurrence of these diseases in your area and your dog’s individual risk factors.

Puppies should receive a series of vaccinations starting at six to eight weeks of age. A veterinarian should administer a minimum of three vaccinations at three- to four-week intervals. The final dose should be administered at 16 weeks of age.

Adult dogs should be vaccinated annually. Do not let your vaccinations lapse in time.

The 5-in-1 inoculation, your dog will receive “DHLPP’ or a 4-in-1 inoculation “DHPP”,  which will protect him from these diseases:

“D” - Distemper is considered to be the most important disease of dogs. It is a very resilient virus and can be contracted through coughing, sneezing or contact with an infected dog’s saliva, urine or stool. Dogs with distemper may suffer coughing, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures and other symptoms, it is usually fatal.

“H” - Hepatitis or infectious canine hepatitis affects the dog’s liver. Spread through an infected dog’s urine, exposure can mean anything from a mild infection to death.

“L” - Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection that affects a dog’s kidneys. “Lepto” can reside as a low-level infection for months or years, infecting other dogs while weakening yours.

“P” Parvovirus, since its devastating worldwide appearance in 1978, has been heard of as “Parvo” by most dog owners. It is transmitted through direct contact with an infected dog’s feces and is highly contagious and epidemic. It affects the lining of the intestines and can be rapidly fatal.

“P” - Parainfluenza, a component of kennel cough, is a highly infectious upper respiratory infvection that shows up as a persistent dry hacking cough.

The 5-in-1 vaccine is given as an intial puppy series of three shots, each scheduled 3 weeks apart. Then it is given as the annual booster. We suggest that previously stray dogs with no owner history be given 2 vaccinations then the yearly booster.

Bordatella Vaccination
Bordatella - Frequently involved in kennel cough, this bacterial infection may occur simultaneously with distemper, adenovirus type 2 infection, parainfluenza and other respiratory infections. Two vaccine types are available to prevent kennel cought, injectable and intranasal. Your veterinarian can help you decide what is best for your pet. 

Rabies Vaccination
Rabies is a fatal infection of the nervous system that can attack any warm blooded animal including a human. It is a public health hazard and a personal risk to all pet owners and it is required by law that all dogs be vaccinated against rabies. Rabies can be transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Even dogs kept indoors can come in contact with rabies carriers (skunks, raccoons, bats and foxes) in their own attics, garages or basement.

The first rabies vaccination should be given at 5 months of age, with the first booster shot given one year later (at 15 months of age). Thereafter, give boosters annually or every three years, according to state and local statutes. Rabies vaccination schedules are regulated by law.

Fecal Exam, or a microscopic examination of the stool, is necessary to determine if your dog is harboring internal papasites. Symptoms are not always evident but can include general poor condition, vomiting and diarrhea and can result in malnutrition and even death. Your dog can pick up different parasites just being outside.

Heartworm is probably the most serious parasitic infection of dogs. This is because heartworm disease is quite common and fatal if left untreated. Adult heartworms are long, thread-like worms that lodge in the dog’s heart, impeding blood flow and eventually causing congestive heart failure and death. Adult worms produce microscopic larvae that circulate in the dog’s bloodstream. The disease is transmitted when a mosquito bites an infected dog, ingests the microscopic larvae and then infests other dogs that the mosquite bites. Dogs do not even have to be outside. It only takes one mosquito to get in your home.

Signs of heartworm disease are listlessness and poor endurance, frequent coughing, labored breathing and loss of weight and condition.

The AWL clinic offers heartworm testing at six months of age. We offer a variety of heartworm preventatives as well including Heartgard© and Revolution ©

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What vaccines does my cat need?

The first goal of good pet health is to try to prevent diseases. And this is what vaccinations do. After all, it’s much easier to prevent a disease than to treat it once it strikes. Proper vaccinations are a very reliable way to prevent diseases ave money and assure a happy, healthy pet.

Young kittens are highly susceptible to certain infectious diseases and should be vaccinated against them as soon as they are old enough to build immunity.

Kittens should receive a series of vaccinations starting at six to eight weeks of age. A veterinarian should administer a minimum of three vaccinations at three- to four-week intervals. The final dose should be administered at 16 weeks of age.

Adult cats should be vaccinated annually.

The 5-in-1 inoculation, your cat will receive “FVRCP”, which will protect him from these diseases:

“FVR” - Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis is a severe upper respiratory infection caused by a feline type 1, herpes-virus. It is most severe in young kittens and older cats, and is one of the most serious upper respiratory diseases seen in the feline species. The virus is airborne and very contagious in susceptible animals.

“C” – Calicivirus Infection. There are several strains of caliciviruses that affect the cat. They can cause a range of diseases, from a mild almost asymptomatic infection, to life-threatening pneumonia. Most cases show only evidence of problems in the mouth, nasal passages and the conjunctiva (mucus membranes) of the eyes.

“P” = Panleukopenia (also known as feline distemper and infectious feline enteritis) is a highly contagious disease characterized by a short course and high mortality rate. The disease is caused by a parvovirus similar to the parvovirus seen in dogs. It is very resistant and may remain infectious in the environment for up to a year.

The disease is most severe in young kittens, but can affect cats of all ages. The first symptom is loss of appetite, followed by vomiting and diarrhea. A blood count usually shows a lowered number of white blood cells, a fact which helps in diagnosing the infection

Bordatella Vaccination
Bordatella - Frequently involved in kennel cough and other respiratory diseases, this bacterial infection is highly contagious, easily transmitted through the air or direct contact.  Two vaccine types are available to prevent kennel cough, injectable and intranasal. Your veterinarian can help you decide what is best for your pet. 

Rabies Vaccination
Rabies is a fatal infection of the nervous system that can attack any warm blooded animal including a human. It is a public health hazard and a personal risk to all pet owners and it is required by law that all cats be vaccinated against rabies. Rabies can be transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Even cats kept indoors can come in contact with rabies carriers (skunks, raccoons, bats and foxes) in their own attics, garages or basement.

The first rabies vaccination should be given at 5 months of age, with the first booster shot given one year later (at 15 months of age). Thereafter, give boosters annually or every three years, according to state and local statutes. Rabies vaccination schedules are regulated by law.

Fecal Exam, or a microscopic examination of the stool, is necessary to determine if your cat is harboring internal papasites. Symptoms are not always evident but can include general poor condition, vomiting and diarrhea and can result in malnutrition and even death. Your cat can pick up different parasites just being outside.
 

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Should I test my cat for FeLV & FIV viral diseases?

We recommend viral testing for all cats at six months of age. These viruses can lay dormant, similar to AIDS in humans, and can cause problems in the future. They can be spread to any other cat in the household by cat to cat contact, so it is safest to screen any new cat before exposure to other cats.

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When should I sterilize my cat?

The surgery can be performed anytime over the age of 8 weeks, but we generally recommend waiting until four to five months of age. Cats usually do not reach puberty before 6 months.

It is not better for a cat to go through a heat cycle or have a litter before being spayed. A spay is an ovariohysterectomy - the ovaries and uterus are removed.

Male cats generally do not spray before reaching puberty. The smell of their urine and undesirable marking behavior is prevented with neutering. When a male cat is neutered, the testicles are removed.
 

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When should I sterilize my dog?

The surgery can be performed anytime over the age of 4-5 months because they aren’t too young and it’s also right before puberty starts.

Spaying your female dog will help prevent her from developing uterine infections and breast cancer. Your spayed dog won't go into heat.

Neutering your male dog may prevent him from developing testicular cancer, but only if it's done prior to 6 months of age. Your neutered dog will be less likely to roam away from home.
 

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